Acquired Aphasia in Children (Nato Science Series D:)



Publisher: Springer

Written in English
Cover of: Acquired Aphasia in Children (Nato Science Series D:) |
Published: Pages: 328 Downloads: 69
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Subjects:

  • Clinical psychology,
  • Neurology & clinical neurophysiology,
  • Neurology - General,
  • Congresses,
  • Pediatrics,
  • Aphasiology,
  • Pediatric Neurology,
  • Medical,
  • Medical / Nursing,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Language acquisition,
  • Linguistics,
  • Brain,
  • Language Arts & Disciplines-Linguistics,
  • Medical / Neurology,
  • Medical / Pediatrics,
  • Medical-Neurology - General,
  • Aphasia, Acquired,
  • Aphasic children

Edition Notes

ContributionsIsabel Pavão Martins (Editor), A. Castro-Caldas (Editor), Hugo R. van Dongen (Editor), Anne van Hout (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages328
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7806649M
ISBN 100792313151
ISBN 109780792313151

Aphasia Symptoms In Children. The characteristic feature of Acquired childhood aphasia is sudden stopping of talking or comprehending a language for a few weeks or even years together. However, the condition can be treatable provided adequate encouragement and support is provided to the child. Landau–Kleffner syndrome (LKS)—also called infantile acquired aphasia, acquired epileptic aphasia or aphasia with convulsive disorder—is a rare childhood neurological syndrome. It is named after William Landau and Frank Kleffner, who characterized it in with a diagnosis of six lty: Neurology, psychiatry. Apraxia of Speech. What is apraxia of speech? Apraxia of speech (AOS)—also known as acquired apraxia of speech, verbal apraxia, or childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) when diagnosed in children—is a speech sound disorder. Someone with AOS has trouble saying what he or she wants to say correctly and consistently. AOS isFile Size: 1MB. CHILDREN'S ACQUIRED APHASIA SCREENING TEST CHILDREN'S ACQUIRED APHASIA SCREENING TEST Whurr, Renata; Evans, Sara Diagnosis in acquired childhood aphasia (ACA) is a multi‐stage process. After the medical condition has stabilised, the diagnostic evaluation requires careful assessment to establish a profile in the differential .

Acquired epileptic aphasia is a progressive condition that mainly occurs in children of about 6 years of age and is characterized by gradual loss of expressive and receptive language ability. Most children affected by Acquired epileptic aphasia also experience epileptic seizures at night due to paroxysmal electroencephalographic changes. Apraxia of speech is sometimes called acquired apraxia of speech, verbal apraxia, or dyspraxia. It is a motor speech disorder. You can also have apraxia in other parts of your body, like in your arms or legs. This is called limb apraxia. How severe your apraxia is depends on what type of brain damage you have. Acquired Language Disorders: A Case-Based Approach, Second Edition - Ebook written by James M. Mancinelli, Evelyn R. Klein. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Acquired Language Disorders: A Case-Based Approach, Second Edition. Acquired epileptic aphasia 1 is an epileptic syndrome described in the International Classification of Epilepsies by the eponym Landau–Kleffner syndrome (LKS). Typical LKS 2,3 is part of the epileptic encephalopathy of late childhood defined by 1: age of onset ranging from 3 to 10 years in children with previously normal language development; 2 insidious or abrupt acquired aphasia .

Acquired Aphasia in Children (Nato Science Series D:) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Acquired aphasia in children, albeit Acquired Aphasia in Children book, is a unique circumstance in which to study the relations between language and the brain during cerebral maturation.

Its study further contributes to our understanding of the recovery processes and brain plasticity during : Hardcover. The second edition of this book covering the main causes of acquired speech and language disorders in childhood both updates and expands the subject material. A total of 25 cases of children with these disorders are described and their management explained in detail, most from onset and including long term by: Acquired aphasia in children, albeit rare, is a Acquired Aphasia in Children book circumstance in which to study the relations between language and the brain during cerebral maturation.

Its study further contributes to our understanding of the recovery processes and brain plasticity during childhood. Acquired aphasia in children, albeit rare, is a unique circumstance in which to study the relations between language and the brain during cerebral maturation. Its study further contributes to.

Description: Acquired childhood aphasia (ACA) refers to the language impairments that may follow a brain lesion sustained after the age of acquisition of first sentences. The CAAST is designed to identify language disturbances in brain- damaged children in the three to seven year old age group who acquire ACA following accident or illness.

One of the most fascinating problems in Behavioural Neurology is the question of the cerebral organization for language during childhood.

Acquired aphasia in children. ALAJOUANINE, F. LHERMITTE, ACQUIRED APHASIA IN CHILDREN, Brain, Vol Issue 4, NovemberPages –, by: With chapters containing up to 50 percent new coverage, this book provides a thorough update of the latest research and development in the area of acquired aphasia.

Coverage includes the symptoms of aphasia, assessment, neuropsychology, the specific linguistic deficits associated with aphasia, related disorders, recovery, and rehabilitation.

With chapters containing up to 50 percent new coverage, this book provides a thorough update of the latest research and development in the area of acquired aphasia. Coverage includes the symptoms 4/5(1).

Acquired Aphasia in Children Anne Van Hout Acquired childhood aphasia is rare but has important conceptual implications for developmental neuropsychology. The last 15 years have seen major changes in their clinical description, which have led to the awareness that the syndromes in acquired childhood aphasia are more similar to the syndromes in adult Cited by: About this book.

Introduction. One of the most fascinating problems in Behavioural Neurology is the question of the cerebral organization for language during childhood. Acquired aphasia in children, albeit rare, is a unique circumstance in which to study the relations between language and the brain during cerebral maturation.

Description: With chapters containing up to 50 percent new coverage, this book provides a thorough update of the latest research and development in the area of acquired aphasia. Coverage includes the symptoms of aphasia, assessment, neuropsychology, the specific linguistic deficits associated with aphasia, related disorders, recovery, and rehabilitation.

Acquired Aphasia and Residual Dysphasia in Children The term childhood acquired aphasia should be restricted to those children who had acquired language normally and then, subsequent to identified cerebral pathology suffered through accident or disease, became impaired in language functioning.

If the child improvesFile Size: KB. Aphasia refers to a loss or disruption of the ability to understand or produce language through spoken or written words due to injury to specific areas of the brain involved in language, almost always located in the left-hemisphere of the brain.

The acquired aphasia in children is a rarely seen speech and language disorders. Disturbances develop after the child has already achieved the capacity for language comprehension and verbal expression.

Brain trauma is most often the cause. The clinical picture of the disorder varies over different age groups and, Cited by: 9. Acquired Aphasia in Children Acquisition and Breakdown of Language in the Developing Brain (NATO ASI Series. Series D: Behavioural and Social Sciences, Vol. 60)Author: Ruth Nass.

Like adults, children can exhibit language disorders from injury to the central nervous system after a period of normal development.

Childhood-acquired language disorder, or childhood-acquired aphasia, refers to language impairment evident after a period of normal language acquisition that is precipitated by, or associated with, an identified Cited by:   Causes of Aphasia in Children Aphasia is caused by brain damage to the area that processes language.

The causes can be varied, from cerebral contusions, to diseases such as cerebral parasitosis, brain tumors, meningitis, epilepsy, etc. When it is impossible to determine a clear cause of aphasia, it is called dysphasia. Inthe neurologist William M. Landau and the pedagogue Frank R.

Kleffner observed six children who all suffered from acquired aphasia and some kind of epilepsy and found a syndrome they called Syndrome of Acquired Aphasia with Convulsive Disorders in Children.

10 Nowadays, the syndrome is mostly called Landau-Kleffner Syndrome (LKS). Book Description. The long-held belief that acquired aphasia in children is primarily of the non-fluent type has been challenged in recent years.

This book discusses language problems arising from cerebro-vascular accidents occurring in childhood, and from other. Sarno MT (ed): Acquired Aphasia in Children. New York, Academic Press, Cited by: The long-held belief that acquired aphasia in children is primarily of the non-fluent type has been challenged in recent years.

This book discusses language problems arising from cerebro-vascular accidents occurring in childhood, and from other. Free shipping for non-business customers when ordering books at De Gruyter Online.

Please find details to our shipping fees here. RRP: Recommended Retail Price. Print Flyer; Overview; Content; Book Book Series. Previous chapter. Next chapter. Acquired Aphasia in Children Acquired Aphasia in Children (). In Linguistic Disorders and.

Books shelved as aphasia: One Hundred Names for Love: A Memoir by Diane Ackerman, My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist's Personal Journey by Jill Bolt. 13 Acquired Aphasia in Children In summary, the data suggest that syntactic comprehension often is im- paired following left brain involvement.

Poor performance by right-hemi- sphere-lesioned subjects appears to be related to spatial demands of the task and/or to more generalized brain Size: 3MB.

ACQUIRED DISORDERS OF LANGUAGE (APHASIA): EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVENESS OF INTERVENTION. Get this from a library. Acquired aphasia. [Martha Taylor Sarno;] -- With chapters containing up to 50 percent new coverage, this book provides a thorough update of the latest research and development in the area of acquired aphasia.

Coverage includes the symptoms of. Aphasia is an acquired language disorders due to a brain damage that affect all modalities: oral expression, auditory comprehension, reading and writing.

Aphasia Handbook for Adults and. Aphasia is an acquired neurogenic language disorder resulting from an injury to the brain—most typically, the left hemisphere.

Aphasia involves varying degrees of impairment in four primary areas: Spoken language expression. Spoken language comprehension. Written expression. Reading comprehension.

Depending on an individual’s unique set of. Childhood aphasia can happen at any time – in utero, during birth, or at any time during the child's life in which a stroke or other brain injury occurs.

Many families are left without guidance and a good plan for therapy, school, social lives, and more. Pediatric aphasia is different from a typical language developmental disorder. With chapters containing up to 50 percent new coverage, this book provides a thorough update of the latest research and development in the area of acquired aphasia.

Coverage includes the symptoms of aphasia, assessment, neuropsychology, the specific linguistic deficits associated with aphasia, related disorders, recovery, and : $Acquired childhood aphasia (ACA) refers to the language impairments that may follow a brain lesion sustained after the age of acquisition of first sentences.

The CAAST is designed to identify language disturbances in brain- damaged children in the three to seven year old age group who acquire ACA following accident or : Renata Whurr, Sarah Evans. We studied eight children with acquired aphasia. All had left hemisphere lesions. In most, the correlation between the CT lesion site and the resulting aphasic syndrome duplicated an anatomic-clinical correlation described in adults.

Rapid recovery of language fluency distinguished the children from reported adults. Late follow-up indicated poor scholastic achievements, reflecting an acquired Cited by: